T.M. Glass

T.M. Glass combines state-of-the-art digital photography and digital painting to create portraits of flowers that are then printed in limited edition at very high resolution. Although the result may echo historical still-life painting, Glass has fully embraced technology and the latest digital tools available to mix colours, collage pieces of her canvas together, and refine her photographs with digital rather than physical brushstrokes. The artist's still-life flower series includes flowers from renowned gardens around the world, and fine vases & other vessels from museums and distinguished collections.

Arden Gallery   -   T.M. Glass, "Peonies in a White and Blue Chinese Peacock Vase," archival pigment print on hand-made Italian rag paper, 52 x 52 inches (also available in 30 x 30", 42 x 42"; 58 x 58"), contact for price

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T.M. Glass, "Peonies in a White and Blue Chinese Peacock Vase," archival pigment print on hand-made Italian rag paper, 52 x 52 inches (also available in 30 x 30", 42 x 42"; 58 x 58"), contact for price

Arden Gallery   -   T.M. Glass, "Tulips in a Blue, White and Gold Vessel," archival pigment print on hand-made Italian rag paper, 52 x 52 inches (also available in 30 x 30", 42 x 42"; 58 x 58"), contact for price

T.M. Glass, "Tulips in a Blue, White and Gold Vessel," archival pigment print on hand-made Italian rag paper, 52 x 52 inches (also available in 30 x 30", 42 x 42"; 58 x 58"), contact for price

Arden Gallery   -   T.M. Glass, "Blue Poppy in a Blue and White Chinese Vase," archival pigment print on hand-made Italian rag paper, 30 x 30 inches, also available in 52 x 52"; 58 x 58",  contact for price

Click images to enlarge

T.M. Glass, "Blue Poppy in a Blue and White Chinese Vase," archival pigment print on hand-made Italian rag paper, 30 x 30 inches, also available in 52 x 52"; 58 x 58",  contact for price

click to enlarge and show image details

Click images to enlarge

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T.M. Glass   -   Arden Gallery

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

T.M. Glass generates limited edition archival pigment prints on archival Italian rag paper. 

 

The latest evolution in the ever-changing art world combines cutting-edge digital photographic technology with traditional painting techniques.

 

T.M. Glass’ hyper-real creations are constructed in a computer with digital input from a high resolution, 150 megapixel prototype Danish camera and a digital painting tablet that enables the artist to paint with techniques used by 17th, 18th, and 19th century artists.

 

This combination harnesses an emerging medium in bold new ways to create gorgeous, oversized still life paintings featuring lushly-colored flowers masterfully arranged in intricate vases that appear three-dimensional.

 

Glass is inspired by the rich colors found in nature and has developed a unique color palate – that doesn’t include primary colors – and employs color theory to skillfully mix the hues on the computer.

 

In the artist's studio a large format six foot digital printer is connected to the computer, where T.M. personally prints each picture there to ensure that each archival pigment print is perfect.

© 2022 by Arden Gallery Ltd.

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“Artist T.M. Glass is known for an independent rebel vision that merges ultra modern digital technology with old school techniques for collage and painting,  resulting in digital paintings that break all the ‘rules’ of contemporary art, abandoning such contemporary art elements as deconstruction, abstraction, flattening, minimalism, avoidance of beauty, avoidance of the illusion of depth, or conceptualization.   In this way the artist joins the new era of ‘post contemporary’ or ‘constructionist’ digital imagery.   

The creation of digital tools for artists can be compared to the 1960s introduction of acrylic paint.   At that time, artists engaging in pioneering experiments found that acrylic paint could create such things as straight edges and flat surfaces, things oil and watercolour could not do.  Acrylic paint allowed a new kind of imagery and permitted the development of contemporary art.   The introduction of digital tools has had a similar impact.  Digital software tools such as layers and filters permit new kinds of imagery that cannot be created with physical paint.  

The studio practice of T.M. Glass fully embraces these new digital tools for artists.  In the website www.tmglass.com the artist explains how the use of digital hardware and software impacts the finished images. 

“All of my pictures are created in my own studio using a state of the art computer with hardware input from a large format high resolution camera and a digital painting tablet that allows onscreen painting.  Several kinds of software allow the creation of the imagery and export of pictures to a high resolution, six foot digital printer. The finished works are limited editions of archival pigment prints on hand made archival rag paper.  

I see digital software and hardware as the latest new tools for artists.  I fully embrace the technology and use these digital tools in my work for mixing colours, collaging bits and pieces of photographed images, hand painting with digital paint, adding and subtracting.  In other words, doing whatever I might do if I were using physical paint with the difference being that digital allows greater complexity and far more options and creative opportunities.

The origin of the still life flower series came about while I was documenting the creation of a garden at my house with the first small point and shoot digital cameras that arrived on the domestic market.  As better and better digital cameras and software were developed I got hooked. I always wanted to work with the latest and best digital camera. Those documentary garden pictures led to still life pictures becoming the central focus of my artist practice.  

I began with cut flowers from my own garden in vases from my home collection.  When I ran out of interesting vases I began to work with museum curators who allowed me to photograph vessels from the museum collections.  I was not allowed to touch the vessels or put flowers in them. That meant I had to do two photoshoots:  one at the museum and the other in my garden. I use digital paint to merge the photographs, and work with the digital paint to create the final painting.

Some of the flowers in my pictures are from gardens that are not mine.  In England I photographed flowers from a garden the Queen Mother created. In India I worked with a florist who arranged flowers in vases I rented from an antique dealer.  In Quebec I worked with the gardeners at the historic Jardins de Metis and their flowers were arranged in vases from the Jardin’s museum.” -T.M. Glass

The artist pushes the use of digital tools to the limit, using such things as the software’s ability to zoom into the last pixel for the purpose of adjusting colors.  Working in detailed layers creates a different mind-set of complexity compared with contemporary art’s focus on simplicity.  Contemporary art’s insistence on avoidance of beauty is the opposite of the quest for the beauty of nature that is central to the work of T.M. Glass.

When asked ‘Why flowers?’,  the artist explains that flowers in many cultures are present at all of life’s most significant occasions including weddings, and  funerals, and they speak for us saying such things as:  “I love you”; “Congratulations”; “Condolences”;  “Get well”; “I’m sorry”.

129 Newbury Street 
Boston, MA 02116, USA

main: 617-247-0610
mobile: 617-646-9186

ardengallery@gmail.com

Tuesday - Saturday: 11:00 - 6:00 
Sunday: 12:00 - 5:00
Monday by appointment